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Effective Youth Engagement

Back to Planning & Organizing

Meeting Youth’s Needs Through Garden-Based Learning Experiences
Youth Involvement in the Garden
Benefits and Barriers to Youth Participation
“Taming” the Overly Enthusiastic Adult
Additional Resources

“When it comes to working with children and youth in garden settings, all across the nation, we often miss the boat: adults typically plan, design and implement garden programs, inviting young people to the table after the garden is finished.  While that isn’t ‘bad,’ it surely misses an opportunity.  Our research has shown that gardening interest is more strongly correlated with decision-making than garden activity.  It’s worth taking the time to engage young people in every step from the beginning.” –Marcia Eames-Sheavly, Senior Lecturer & Senior Extension Associate at Cornell University

Meeting Youth’s Needs Through Garden-Based Learning Experiences

It is thrilling to witness a child raise a marigold from a seed s/he has planted, or watch a teen-aged youth create a sunflower house for a younger sibling. Even as we are always interested in horticulture, we are stretching toward what constitutes an ideal experience for all gardeners – not just the garden content, but also the life skills gained through the experience. The Circle of Courage is a model of positive youth development which can inform exciting program goals to meet the needs of all participants. It is a model grounded in the principles of belonging, mastery, independence and generosity, and which integrates the cultural wisdom of native peoples and findings of contemporary youth development research.

Mastery:  Learning by doing “I can.”

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It isn’t difficult to create a long list of all the ways in which someone can gain skills by interacting with the plant world. Hands-on activities, experiential learning, group investigation, and discovery are the backbone of a gardening experience. We encourage educators to focus on the long-term goals of learning and to provide prompt feedback.

A number of years ago, a panel of 4-H youth responded to questions posed by attendees. When asked what frustrates them about the adults in their lives, one teen responded, “You’re all so terrified to see us fail. We can handle it! Let us work it out!” This beautifully exemplifies the desire for mastery. And although it can be one of the hardest lessons in life, in gardening as with everything else, plants die, our goals sometimes aren’t realized, and the beautiful gardens of our dreams occasionally sport weeds. We aim to model and teach that failure and frustration are learning experiences, too.

Belonging:  Cultivate relationships “I belong.”

In this busy culture of over-scheduled activity, it’s easy to forget that more than ever, hanging out with each other has tremendous value. It can be ironic that educators may need to schedule ‘down time’ for program participants to get to know one another; doing so is every bit as important as the learning about tomato cultivars or how to compost. Rainy days and other occasions can be a wonderful chance for indoor activities aimed at cultivating connection. For example, older adults often have tremendous knowledge about gardening; talking with them can be a way to promote relationships outside the usual scope of young people’s affiliations. It’s not difficult to promote ties with family and community, since gardening is our nation’s favorite hobby.students-cropped

Because of all the activity that revolves around the garden, it isn’t challenging to build in small group time to allow for the development of close relationships. Many of the crops we grow have come from all over the world; exploring where our food comes from and celebrating different ways of sharing and preparing food from the garden, for example, can be an exciting way to show respect for the value of diverse cultures. Perhaps most importantly, although plants need to be watered, and the weeds are ever present, a vital aspect of any program is remembering can be to have fun and enjoy one other. Without that, few participants may wish to return.

Generosity:  Gestures of thoughtfulness & shared responsibility “I can make a difference.”

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When we say the word generosity, frequently what comes to mind is the giving away of “things.” No question, there is often a lot of produce or flowers to be shared when you’re in the thick of a terrific gardening experience, and many people in our communities can benefit from shared food and beauty. But generosity can include much more. A skilled garden-based learning educator reinforces gestures of thoughtfulness, and asks participants to take responsibility for others. Critical reflection, as a part of a service-learning experience, can be an important pursuit that leads to compassion, a broader scope, and life-long interest in the community.

Power:  Authentic youth engagement & decision-making “I matter.”
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An area that can be over-looked in the rush toward efficiency and getting things done is fostering power, ownership and independence. For example, in the children’s garden arena, often the people who are the most enthusiastic about gardens and gardening are adults. Nation-wide, these adults are calling the shots, designing gardens for children, developing educational programs for children, instead of thinking in terms of partnership. While this isn’t ‘bad,’ it does reduce learning opportunities and the chance to engage audiences in decision making. A major thrust of our focus is fostering genuine participation in community garden-based projects and exploring ways to better engage participants in decision-making aspects of projects.

When it comes to gardening, there are myriad decisions to make, and before making any, we urge educators to reflect on how to share decision-making to ensure a strong sense of commitment. Include participants of any age in planning, encourage their input, and give them responsibility. There are many obstacles in gardening, from deer and other pests, to weather and site concerns; however, we shouldn’t deprive children in particular of the thrill of overcoming a barrier. Their ideas are often more creative and less burdened with “shoulds” and “the way things are” than ours. Ideally, the power ought to slowly shift to participants through self-governance, with respect to garden planning, design, implementation and maintenance. It might mean revising our notion of committees, meeting structures, timing, and an entire approach to how a project is organized.

All of these four themes – mastery, belonging, power, and generosity – are relatively easy to work into any garden-based learning effort. Remember that the ultimate goal isn’t just raising crops; it’s growing competent, committed, reflective, and caring gardeners. Instead of thinking solely of our subject matter expertise, and the important content to be gained from learning about horticulture, it is equally important to consider program factors such as non-scheduled time, opportunities for friends to join in, chances to make a difference in the community, and avenues through which our young participants can voice an opinion.

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Your Program

To include more opportunities for mastery, belonging, generosity, and power into your garden-based learning effort, try using the tool Planning for Positive Youth Development Through Garden-Based Learning. Consider an activity: planting pumpkins, planning a new garden, or hosting a harvest festival. How might you expand it? Use the planning sheet to dig deeper and get the most out of meeting the needs of participants in the process.
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Youth Involvement in the Garden

Recruiting Youth
If you’re having a difficult time recruiting youth for your project, take a step back and ask “where did this idea come from?” Think about where your project currently falls on the doing to, doing for, or doing with spectrum. Projects operating with a doing to or doing for approach, tend to have a harder time recruiting youth because they have to recruit youth! If your project is taking a doing with approach, youth have most likely been involved in generating or supporting the idea early on and — through their experiences — have developed a sense of ownership that keeps them coming back.

relaxing-on-grassEncouraging Youth Participation
Often youth garden projects are set up with the assumption that adults plan and build the garden. Youth involvement starts with “fun” activities once the garden is in place. Young people have such great ideas and energy that it seems a waste not to involve them in every step of the process. Additionally, if your garden project is intended to be used by youth, involving them ensures that you’re developing a garden that not only meets young people’s needs but also one which they will find interesting and exciting.

Including Youth as Partners
The benefits of involving youth as partners far outweigh the barriers. If you think involving youth in planning will take too long, take a look at your timeline and consider whether it can be altered. Consider starting small and asking around among your volunteers and potential volunteers to see who might want to spearhead this aspect of the project.

Dr. Roger Hart, co-director of the Children’s Environments Research Group, offers suggestions for involving children in community-based projects. A critical point he makes is to avoid efforts that “decorate” or “tokenize” children’s connection to the project, since this does not represent true participation.

  • An example of decoration is when children wear T-shirts promoting a garden program that they neither planned, nor designed, nor implemented.
  • An example of tokenism might be a school in which children are involved in a contest to name the garden, but do not have any input in its planning, design, or implementation.

Hart created a “ladder” of participation to help us think about where we really are and where we’d like to be in terms of children’s participation in our programs. This ladder was not created to suggest that we have to be “at the top” rung, but rather, that we ought to be aiming to get out of the lower rungs of non-participation, and think of ways to genuinely engage children and youth. These resources will guide you through: Using Hart’s Ladder Ages 3-6, Using Hart’s Ladder Ages 7-11 and Using Hart’s Ladder Ages 12-18 (pdfs). Visit our Youth Grow curriculum page for an interactive activity that uses Hart’s Ladder as the framework.harts-ladder

Programming for Older Youth

If middle- and high-school aged youth are the target audience, a garden that offers hands-on experiences in the plant sciences, and in the related field of ecology, botany, plant pathology, and entomology, can be very rewarding. High school science teachers often feel that it is difficult to teach plant science because it is viewed by youth as less animated than animal science. In each of the situations below, gardening is combined with one or more disciplines to create a more ambitious experience for the older child.

  • Composting is an appealing activity-based focus for older youth that also fosters environmental responsibility.
  • Others may want to focus on a different type of stewardship—that of community service—by raising produce for soup kitchens and food pantries. One group of teenagers involved with the Broome County Cooperative Extension returned from a week among the homeless in Washington, D.C. to set up a gardening program to produce food for the hungry.
  • Marketing programs are challenging, too, and can offer students a source of income, while giving them skills in horticulture, communication, and business management.
Benefits and Barriers to Youth Participation

Benefits:

  • Greater Interest: Increasing youth participation in a gardening program path-through-stream-cropped-300x247also broadens the roles young people can play in the project. For example, a talent in art, an interest in math, and a knack for organizing can all lead to a role for a young person who may not be as excited about “plants.” In the same way that adults tend to find their niches of interest within projects, young people may discover that they have an opportunity to do something they enjoy too.
  • Greater Ownership and Responsibility: People take greater responsibility for things in which they are invested; if you’ve contributed your time, energy, and ideas to the project, you’re less likely to be destructive towards it or to let others be.
  • Building Transferable Skills: Planning projects and making collective decisions requires many skills: communicating your ideas and considering others’ ideas; reaching compromises, working together, problem solving; these are all skills that will benefit those involved in the future, regardless of the project or situation.
  • Reduce Time and Costs: Some argue that involving young people in the planning and decision-making process can actually reduce time and costs; by going straight the “users” or “stakeholders,” you reduce the risk of missing the mark and having to make changes.
  • Confidence and Pride: Supporting youth in making meaningful decisions and respecting those decisions can boost their confidence in being able to enact change in their communities and in their own lives.

Barriers:

  • Adults Have All the Knowledge: It’s hard to make good decisions if you don’t have all the information. It’s also hard to feel ownership and responsibility for something if others don’t trust you or feel that you can‘t handle all the information. Assess whether this barrier is just a matter of getting youth the information they need or if the adults are unwilling to share the knowledge they have.
  • Power Distances: Young people are often very far away from the people with the power to make something happen. How many steps does it take to get from student to school district administrator or 4-H member to city council? Is there a way to bridge that gap more effectively?
  • Perceived Capabilities: Young people can’t do this; they don’t have the knowledge/ understanding/ interest/ ability to make these decisions.
  • It Takes Too Long: It would be great to have young people more involved but we want the garden finished by the end of next month. (Ask yourself: Who sets the deadlines? Why are they set as such? How flexible are they? Are there benefits to taking more time?)
  • It’s Not Always Easy: We don’t have the time, expertise, or resources to involve youth in decision-making on this project. What can you do now with the time and resources you have? Can you start small and increase as you go along?

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“Taming” the Overly Enthusiastic Adult

When adult leaders launch a new effort aimed at increasing youth participation, they’re surprised to find that their biggest program challenge isn’t engaging young people; it’s often curbing enthusiastic grown-ups who rush in to “help.” Here are some ideas for fostering participation without bruising feelings of would-be adult assistants along the way:

  • Organize a meeting with all parents, teachers, and volunteers who intend to be involved with the project. Talk with them about your approach, what you’re doing, what the children and youth will be responsible for, and how adults might support the project in other ways.
  • If you’re hosting an event for children and youth, consider hosting an adult-oriented event or activity concurrently. For example, while children and youth are talking and sharing ideas, adults can be in an adjacent room, generating lists of people in the community who could provide skills, talents, or funding – or listening to a presenter on a topic of interest.
  • Be very explicit about roles whenever adults are going to be present. For example, in a youth program held at Cornell, adult chaperones were sent a letter in advance that notified them of their roles.
  • Organize a special evening opportunity for children and youth to teach their parents or guardians about what they’ve learned in the program. For example, at a harvest dinner or special event, children/youth might walk the adults through the garden, teaching or demonstrating one of the tasks they learned. This may give the adults a better appreciation for the capabilities of their children and youth. This event might also be an appropriate time to talk with children and youth about the roles of adults, things that adults may do to enhance the program, and when these might be most welcome.
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Additional Resources

Act for Youth, Positive Youth Development 101 Manual

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Identify Plant and Insects

 

Identifying and quantifying what you are observing will allow you to produce visuals of trends and patterns.

Identify Plants and Insects

Note common plants and creatures such as spiders, insects, pollinators, wildlife, and even domesticated animals. How are they are interacting with landscape features and each other.
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Some resources:

Identify Site Features and Characteristics

  • Examine soil texture and composition. Is it clayey, loamy, sandy? Dry or wet? Consider getting a sorain gaugeil test.
  • Make a map of your site—identify on the map where certain plants/soil types/areas are located.
  • Determine which plant hardiness zone your site is located in.
  • Identify some of the specific plant species/cultivars you observed growing on your property site.
  • Identify how much rainfall your area usually gets? How much sunlight does each part of your site receive?
  • Identify native and invasive plant species around your property.

Some resources:

Identify Patterns

  • Are there any places in the garden/property that are frequently inundated with water, or are more susceptible to drying out? Record the month/time and duration this usually occurs. (If you made a map including the terrain of your site, you may want to refer to it as a guide for where these places may be)
  • Mark the dates and weather conditions on which the plant shows developments of the first leaf, first bud, first flower, full bloom, and die-off.water map
  • When (what month/time of day) do you generally use the most water? Are there any garden practices that enable you to use less?
  • Quantify any damage that occurs to your plants (via pathogens, deer, insects, mites) and also the time it takes for the plant to recover (if it does). Did any variables induce these changes? Is there a type of damage a certain plant is resilient to and, are there some plants that are more resilient than others? Was yield affected?

Mosaic Making

Back to Dig Art!

Adapt these activities to the age, interest, and skill levels of your group.mosaic-150x150

Seed Mosaic Planter (pdf)
Stepping Stones(pdf)
Flower Mandala(pdf)

Connections to NYS Learning Standards

Mosaics are a great way to introduce more color into a garden, especially when plants stop flowering throughout the winter months. Pictures or designs made up of pieces of smaller materials, mosaics can be made with pretty much anything – new, old, recycled, or found materials such as tiles, beads, buttons, glass, and mirrors. Natural materials such as shells, stalks, and leaves found in the garden also work well for certain mosaic projects as long as they have been protected for exterior use.

Making an outdoor mosaic is also a great way to personalize a garden space and give it a unique look and feel. You can mosaic most anything in a garden – flowerpots and containers, paths and walkways, benches and tables, walls and fences, water fountains, and garden tools such as trowel handles and wheelbarrows. The design of the mosaic can be simply decorative or it can depict natural elements such as the very plants and insects that are found in the garden.

The mosaic making process is both a leisurely activity as well as productive endeavor.  After only a few hours of steady work, an incredible mosaic image emerges, thus making it an immensely satisfying activity that appeals to youth and adults alike.

The Benefits of Mosaic Projects

  • Creating mosaics with young people can help to improve their self-esteem through empowerment, motivation, ownership, and inclusion.
  • Working together as a group on a mosaic project improves teamwork and communication.
  • Mosaics are a very versatile project — they can be an individual or collective enterprise, they can be simple or elaborate, or can be made from recycled and found materials.
  • Children and youth will be interested in this art medium, which is similar to the collage technique. The materials allow for creativity and the results of a mosaic project are almost instantaneous.
  • Youth and adults are all brought together in making a very original, important contribution to their community that because of its permanence is a continuous source of pride.

A Little Mosaic History

  • Mosaics have been created and used decoratively throughout the world and since ancient times.
  • The Romans popularized mosaics as an art medium – on indoor and outdoor walls, floors, ceilings, and in gardens.
  • The Greeks created mosaics from pebbles that had been softened by the sea. They created pictorial mosaics that told a story, rather than being simply decorative.
  • The world-famous Spanish artist Gaudi created mosaic installations in Barcelona, Spain using primarily recycled and found materials. He covered entire buildings from floor to ceiling with mosaic art. It since has become a world-renown public art installation that people flock to Spain to visit.
  • Mosaics made from pebbles were important features in gardens in China. The Chinese made mosaic pathways that symbolized the natural world around them. Each pebble was precisely arranged to maintain the balance of Yin (feminine force of nature) and Yang (masculine force of nature) in the garden.

Mosaic Project Ideas

  • Create a gift item such as a mosaic picture frame or mosaic jewelry box. Put a picture of your garden inside the frame or make seed jewelry from seeds collected in the garden to store inside the jewelry box.
  • Create mosaic stepping stones for a decorative garden pathway.
  • Create a mosaic mural in your community—put it in a prominent public place such as a garden or park, at a farmers market, or on the wall of a grocery store.
  • Create a mosaic in your garden that features your school or organization’s name and logo.
  • Create mosaic seating in the garden on benches and small stools.
  • Mosaic terracotta pots and planters.

Mosaic Methods
There are two different methods that can be used in creating a mosaic. The direct method is when the mosaic is constructed directly on the base material, which is the site of the project. An example of a direct method would be creating a mosaic on a brick wall located in a garden.

The indirect method is when the mosaic is created on a base material offsite and then later installed onsite when it is convenient. An example of this would be creating a mosaic on a tile and then mounting the tile with concrete onto a wall. This method is useful because it allows you to make a mosaic indoors, so for example, you could make it during the winter and then install it when the weather warms up in the spring or summer.

Basic Mosaic Materials

  • Nippers (specialized clippers used for cutting mosaic tile pieces)
  • Trowel
  • Palette knife
  • Safety goggles
  • Rubber gloves
  • Dust mask
  • Tesserae*
  • Adhesive*
  • Grout*

*Note about the materials:
Tesserae are pieces of ceramic, glass, stone, or other materials used to create a mosaic design.

  • Try to re-use old or recycled materials as tesserae whenever possible, such as broken ceramic tiles, stained glass, mirrors, beach glass, china, and pottery.

Adhesives are used to help the tesserae adhere to the base material.

  • For a plastic or metal base, use exterior tile adhesive.
  • For a ceramic or concrete base, use exterior cement-based adhesive.
  • For other projects, use acrylic adhesive or latex-based adhesives (often called mastic).

Grout is used to fill the spaces between the tesserae, adding strength and durability to the mosaic. Also, grout joints bring linear aesthetic quality to a design.

  • All grout contains Portland cement. It is available in a range of colors and either sanded or non-sanded. Non-sanded is fine for most projects.
  • Mosaics designed for outdoors must use water and frost-resistant cement and grout.
  • Mix dry powdered grout with a small amount of water for a thick, smooth consistency similar to heavy mud.
  • Mortar is a mixture of sand, Portland cement, and water that can be used as grout for exterior mosaic installations.

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Connections to NYS Learning Standards

Activity:  SEED MOSAIC PLANTER
Health, Physical Education, and Home Economics
STANDARD 2   Students acquire knowledge and ability necessary to maintain a healthy environment. Students develop community approaches to enhance the quality of their environment.
STANDARD 3  Students understand and manage personal and community resources. Students collect seeds and beans from gardens and other outdoor areas.

Mathematics, Science and Technology
STANDARD 1  Students use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design to pose questions and develop solutions.
STANDARD 2  Students access, generate, process, and transfer information using technologies.
STANDARD  3  Students understand math and become mathematically confident by communication and reasoning. Look at recurring patterns.
STANDARD 4  Students understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories as they identify, decorate with, and then plant seeds and beans.
STANDARD 5  Students apply technological knowledge and skills to design, construct, use, and evaluate products.  Students design and model a planter.
STANDARD 6  Students understand and apply relationships and common themes that connect math, science, and technology.  Students use simple instruments.
STANDARD  7 Students apply knowledge and skills of math, science, and technology to address problems. Students learn how to improve their environment.

English Language Arts
STANDARD 1  Students listen, speak, read, and write for information and understanding. Students collect data, facts, and ideas, discovering relationships, concepts, and generalizations, and using knowledge from oral, written, and electronic sources. Students use  books and online galleries for inspirational photos and ideas.

The Arts
STANDARD 2  Students make use of materials and resources for participation in the arts (sketches,  designing mosaic planters).
STANDARD 3  Students will analyze visual characteristics of the natural environment and explain social, cultural, psychological, and environmental dimensions of the visual arts. Students respond critically to variety of works in the arts.
STANDARD 4  Students understand personal and cultural forces that shape artistic communications. Students explore concept of art made with nature.

Social Studies
STANDARD 2  Students in their study of world history can explain some practices as found in particular civilizations and cultures  such as traditions, language and literature. Mosaic planters are a traditional Mexican art form used for harvest festivals and ceremonies.

Activity:  STEPPING STONES
Health, Physical Education, and Home Economics
STANDARD 2   Students acquire knowledge and ability necessary to maintain a healthy environment.
STANDARD 3  Students understand and manage personal and community resources.  Students participate in a school community service project. Students use tesserae (marbles, tiles, broken pieces of china, stones for mosaic stepping stones).

Mathematics, Science, and Technology
STANDARD 1  Students use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design to pose questions and develop solutions.
STANDARD 2  Students access, generate, process, and transfer information using technologies.
STANDARD  3  Students understand math and become mathematically confident by communication and reasoning.  Look at recurring patterns.
STANDARD 4  Students understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories. Colorful mosaic designs will help attract various types of small animals like birds and butterflies, which students can observe, study, and draw.
STANDARD 5  Students apply technological knowledge and skills to design, construct, use, and evaluate products.
STANDARD 6  Students understand and apply relationships and common themes that connect math, science, and technology.  Students use simple instruments.
STANDARD  7 Students apply knowledge and skills of math, science, and technology to address problems. Students learn how to improve their environment.

English Language Arts
STANDARD 1  Students listen, speak, read, and write for information and understanding. Students collect data, facts, and ideas, discovering relationships, concepts, and generalizations, and using knowledge from oral, written, and electronic sources.

The Arts
STANDARD 2  Students make use of materials and resources for participation in the arts (templates,  stepping stones).
STANDARD 3  Students will analyze visual characteristics of the natural environment and explain social, cultural, psychological, and environmental dimensions of the visual arts.
Students respond critically to variety of works in the arts.
STANDARD 4  Students understand personal and cultural forces that shape artistic communications. Students explore concept of art made with nature.

Activity:  FLOWER MANDALA
Health, Physical Education, and Home Economics
STANDARD 2   Students acquire knowledge and ability necessary to maintain a healthy environment. Students develop skills of cooperation and collaboration. Students work constructively with others to accomplish a goal in a group activity. Students will follow directions as they demonstrate responsible personal and social behavior as limits are set on where and how much material to collect.
STANDARD 3  Students understand and manage personal and community resources. Students use natural and found materials.

Mathematics, Science, and Technology
STANDARD 1  Students use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design to pose questions and develop solutions.
STANDARD 2  Students access, generate, process, and transfer information using technologies. Students can further transform their digital flower mandala photos into a  kaleidoscopic design.
STANDARD  3  Students understand math and become mathematically confident by communication and reasoning. Look at recurring patterns.
STANDARD 4  Students understand and apply scientific concepts, principles and theories. Students can observe a truly ephemeral flower mandala if done outdoors as it changes and degrades as it is exposed to natural elements.
STANDARD 5   Students apply technological knowledge and skills to design, construct, use and evaluate products and systems to satisfy human and environmental needs.
STANDARD 6  Students understand and apply relationships and common themes that connect math, science, and technology.  Students observe and describe interaction among components of simple systems and identify common things that can be considered to be systems (e.g., a  plant population).  Students use different types of models, such as graphs, sketches, diagrams, and maps, to represent various aspects of the real world. Students understand the interrelatedness of life on earth.
STANDARD  7  Students apply knowledge and skills of math, science, and technology to address problems. Evident as students improve their habitat.

English Language Arts
STANDARD 1  Students listen, speak, read, and write for information and understanding. Students collect data, facts, and ideas, discovering relationships, concepts, and generalizations, and using knowledge from oral, written, and electronic sources.
STANDARD 4  Students listen, speak, read, and write for social interaction. Students talk about process of design and harvesting mosaic materials.

The Arts

STANDARD 2  Students make use of materials and resources for participation in the arts. Students  create a flower mandala.
STANDARD 3  Students will analyze visual characteristics of the natural environment and explain social, cultural, psychological, and environmental dimensions of the visual arts. Students respond critically to variety of works in the arts.  Evident when students discuss Andy Goldsworthy’s artwork.
STANDARD 4  Students understand personal and cultural forces that shape artistic communications. Students explore concept of art made with nature.

Social Studies

STANDARD 2  Students in their study of world history can explain some practices as found in particular civilizations and cultures  such as traditions, language and literature. Students learn that mandala is a Sanskrit word that roughly translates as “sacred circle.”

 

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Understand

Introduction | Participate | Understand | Monitor | Adapt | Mitigate | Activities | Case Studies | Links | Downloadable PDF

It’s not just thermometers telling us the climate is changing. The living world (including plants, insects, and weeds) are responding to change as well.  The life cycles of insects, including the beneficial ones that keep others in check, are becoming out of sync with their prey. Pollinators, like honeybees, may already be out of sync with the plants they feed on. Earlier flowering and fruiting of plants has caused a great disconnect for some long-distance migrating birds, who depend on food availability at the same time each year.

Signs of climate change in the garden:

CCG-lilac

•    Plants are leafing out and blooming earlier.
•    Birds and butterflies are breeding and migrating earlier, disrupting important pollinator-to-plant connections.
•    Invasive, non-native plants and animals are expanding because they are able to take advantage of weakened ecosystems and are able to out-compete native species.
•    Native and iconic plants may no longer find suitable climate conditions in major portions of their historic range.
•    Some plants are failing because the winter cooling period isn’t long enough, and others suffer when summer evenings are not cool enough.
•    Rain events are more extreme, taking the form of longer droughts and more frequent floods.
•    Longer warm periods mean more generations of some pests per year. Others are increasing their number because winters aren’t cold enough to keep them in check.
•    Weedy and invasive plants like poison ivy, honeysuckle and kudzu, thrive in the presence of extra carbon dioxide, and poison ivy becomes more toxic than ever.
•    Native plant populations are threatened by these changes in temperature, rainfall, pests and competitors, even the iconic ones chosen as state flowers and trees. In fact, the National Wildlife Federation predicts that 28 states will see their official plants become extinct by the end of the century.

Impacts of climate change on gardens:

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•    More frequent and severe weather extremes, including heat waves, droughts and floods.
•    The expansion of harmful invasive species, pests and diseases.
•    The disruption of ecosystems.
•    The extinction of thousands of species–all of which are disasters for nature, let alone gardeners.
•    Changing plant hardiness zones

(Source: The Arbor Day Foundation)

Related activities (pdfs):
•   Garden Sombreros
•   Arctic Tale
•   Connecting with Peers in the Arctic

Monitor

Introduction | Participate | Understand | Monitor | Adapt | Mitigate | Activities | Case Studies | Links | Downloadable PDF

Citizen science programs like Project Budburst are great ways to get youth closer to nature, while simultaneously providing valuable scientific data to researchers about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment.

Through engaging in one of these programs, youth will learn important concepts such as:

  • Dichotomous key: Youth will learn how to use the dichotomous key to identify some of their local plant species that they will monitor for changes.
  • Plant observation and data collection: They will return to the same plant a number of times to mark the dates and weather conditions on which the plant shows developments of the first leaf, first bud, first flower, full bloom, and die-off.
  • Plant phenology (changes in life cycle events over time): Youth will learn how the climate affects plant life cycle events, and in turn how changes in plant life cycle events can affect natural ecosystems and human life activities.

Garden Guidance

Your gateway to Cornell program resources relevant to gardening.
Troubleshooting
Food Gardening
Lawns & Landscapes
Pollinator Protection
Composting
Healthy Soil
Gardening in a Warming World
Invasive Species
Site Design
NY County Extension Gardening Resources

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Discover additional resources through our national Extension network.

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